Monday, October 13, 2014

On Making Mistakes, and Learning from Them

 "Blue Bouquet" (revisited)
12 x 12, oil

The painting above is the new version.
I painted this painting earlier this year, and I liked a lot of things about it but something just wasn't right.  In fact, I posted it, but I never even signed it and had it staring at me in my studio for months.  I finally figured out that the handle on the left side was making it a little awkward, and I should fix it.  Here's the first version of the same painting, with the awkward handle.

~ old version

That's the really cool thing about painting... if it's wrong, I can fix it.  I can cover up my mistakes.  Wow, don't we wish life was like that sometimes?  However, in life, we can't always "cover up" our mistakes.  I have a couple of movie clips I'd like to share with you, if you don't mind.

The first one is from the Lion King.  Rafiki the baboon gives Simba words of wisdom on mistakes he made in the past.  Rafiki wacks Simba on the head and then says it doesn't matter, because it's in the past.  Simba tells him it still hurts.  Rafiki answers, "The past can hurt.  But the way I see it is, you can either run from it, or learn from it."  When he attempts to hit him again, Simba ducks his head.


And the second clip is from Thirteen Going on Thirty.  Jenna asks her mother, "If you were given one do-over, anything in your life, what would it be?"  Her mother tells her she wouldn't change anything.  Her mother says, "Well Jenna, I know I made a lot of mistakes, but I don't regret making any of them.  Because if I hadn't have made them, I wouldn't have learned how to make things right."



Thankfully, my sins are forgiven and forgotten.  I can learn from them, and I can make things right, and I can share this with you.  Thanks for reading, and following my work :)
Hebrews 10:17

4 comments:

  1. I love the revised painting and the descriptive analogy. Beautiful!

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  2. Oh yes, I definitely prefer the second version too, love the looseness and the great contrasts in light/dark .

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